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SDSU

Writing Placement Assessment (WPA)

CSU Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR)

 

Scoring Guide

Students who receive a 10 on the WPA are considered to be writing at a level appropriate for graduation from SDSU. It’s important to point out that only a small percentage of juniors who take the WPA are writing at this level, which is not surprising given that they have completed only two years of their coursework and need additional writing experience to write at a graduation-appropriate level.

10 -- Clears the Graduation Writing Assessment Requirement (GWAR). Students who receive this score do not have to take any additional writing classes at SDSU unless they are required to do so for their major.

  • Writing prompt is proficiently addressed.
  • Analysis of the reading is reasonable, credibly presented, and well developed indicating an awareness of the author’s communicative intent in relation to the audience.
  • Structure is clear, meeting the needs of the analysis.
  • Examples and details provide sufficient support for the analysis.
  • Prose style is good, particularly in terms of syntax and diction.
  • Grammar and mechanics are solid; few distracting errors are present.

8 -- Students who receive this score are considered ready for junior-level writing. These students must enroll in an appropriate “W” course.

  • Writing prompt is adequately addressed.
  • Analysis of the reading is present, if minimal.
  • Structure is functional, yet mechanical.
  • Examples and details support the analysis, but occasionally may be ill chosen.
  • Prose style demonstrates adequate-if basic-syntax and diction.
  • Grammar and mechanics flaws are noticeable, but few distracting errors are present.

6 -- Students who receive these scores must enroll in RWS 280 or LING 281 because they are not considered ready for junior-level writing. Having received a C or above in either class, they must then enroll in an appropriate "W" course.

  • Writing prompt is inadequately addressed.
  • Analysis of the reading is confused, repetitive or underdeveloped.
  • Structure is forced, difficult to follow.
  • Examples and details are sparse and often ill chosen.
  • Prose style demonstrates difficulties with syntax and diction.
  • Grammar and mechanics are poor; an accumulation of distracting errors is present.

4 -- Students who receive these scores must enroll in RWS 280 or LING 281. Having received a C or above in either class, they must then enroll in an appropriate "W" course.

  • Writing prompt is minimally addressed.
  • Analysis of the reading is confused, simplistic or underdeveloped.
  • Structure is forced, difficult to follow.
  • Examples and details are sparse and ill chosen.
  • Prose style demonstrates considerable difficulties with syntax and diction.
  • Grammar and mechanics are very poor; an accumulation of a variety of errors interferes with meaning.

2 -- Students who receive these scores must enroll in RWS 280 or LING 281. Having received a C or above in either class, they must then enroll in an appropriate "W" course.

  • Writing prompt is minimally addressed.
  • Analysis of the reading is confused, incoherent, simplistic or underdeveloped.
  • Structure is forced, difficult to follow, rambling, or incomplete.
  • Examples and details are virtually nonexistent.
  • Prose style is incomprehensible.
  • Grammar and mechanics fail; an accumulation of errors renders the essay unreadable.

0 Off Topic--Non-response essays, which reject or fail to address the question.



Typical Evaluator Comments on Essay that Score 8 and 6

Essays that score an 8 are competent/developed, yet typically:

  • slight and/or fail to address all parts of the prompt;
  • slight analysis too much by summarizing;
  • slight support of main ideas and lack specific support by generalizing; and
  • slight meaning through organization and structure that are too formulaic or perfunctory.

Essays that score a 6 are emerging, because they typically:

  • neglect to address key elements of the prompt through excessive summary, agree or disagree focus, or too much personal opinion;
  • neglect development and support of main ideas through the use of specifics;
  • neglect good organization and structure, unity, and coherence that further meaning; and
  • neglect correct grammar and usage.